Tag Archives: Awareness

Careers in Cybersecurity

Have you considered a career in Cybersecurity? It is a fast-paced, highly dynamic field with a huge number of specialties to choose from, including forensics, endpoint security, critical infrastructure, incident response, secure coding, and awareness and training. In addition, a career in cybersecurity allows you to work almost anywhere in the world, with amazing benefits and an opportunity to make a real difference. However, the most exciting thing is you do NOT need a technical background, anyone can get started.
Source: SANS Security Awareness

Keeping Passwords Simple

We know at times this whole password thing sounds really complicated. Wouldn’t be great if there was a brain dead way you could keep passwords simple and secure at the same time? Well, it’s not nearly as hard as you think. Here are three tips to keeping passwords super simple while keeping your accounts super secure.
Source: SANS Security Awareness

Personalized Scams

Cyber criminals now have a wealth of information on almost all of us. With so many hacked organizations now a days, cyber criminals simply purchase databases with personal information on millions of people, then use that information to customize their attacks, making them far more realistic. Just because an urgent email has your home address, phone number or birth date in it does not mean it is legitimate.
Source: SANS Security Awareness

2 security tricks your cloud provider won’t tell you

Cloudops (cloud operations) and secops (security operations) are quickly evolving practices. While I’m seeing some errors, what’s more common is that ops teams are leaving important things out. If these missing aspects are not addressed, secops will become problematic quickly.

Here are two secops omissions that you can deal with today, even though your public cloud provider won’t tell you about, won’t be on any certification, and is typically widely misunderstood.

Link secops monitoring to govops monitoring

Both secops and govops (governance operations) need to be proactive, meaning that they need to adjust based on changing threats in the case of secops, and changing policies in the case of govops.

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Source: Infoworld.com | Security

Smart Home Devices

Now adays most of us have numerous devices in our homes connect to the Internet. From thermostats and gaming consoles to baby monitors, door locks or even your car. Ensure you change the default passwords on these devices and enable automatic updating.
Source: SANS Security Awareness

Huawei’s possible lawsuit, ransomware readiness, old malware resurfaces | TECH(feed)

The ongoing battle between the U.S. and Huawei could soon go to court as Huawei reportedly prepares to sue the U.S. government. Plus, 2019 will see ride sharing companies going public… but which will be first? And as a decade-old malware resurfaces in enterprise networks, a report questions if the world is ready for the next large-scale ransomware attack.
Source: Infoworld.com | Security

How to address IoT’s two biggest challenges: data and security

You don’t even need to Google “data growth and IoT” to see the trend for the internet of things; all research shows a steep curve up and to the right. The reason is pretty simple: We’re collectively trying to capture fine-grained, ongoing, machine-generated data from a fast-growing universe of devices because the more data, the better the analyses are possible from that data.

At the same time, it’s clear that security for IoT mostly takes a backseat to everything else. Indeed, half the IoT systems I’ve seen in the last few years have little security to no security at all, cloud-based or not.

So there are two major challenges with IoT in the cloud: The rapid growth of data, and the lack of IoT data security.

To read this article in full, please click here


Source: Infoworld.com | Security

Search Yourself Online

Ever wonder just how much information is publicly available about you? Ever wonder how cyber criminals harvest information and customize attacks for their victims. The technique is called Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) and it is far simpler and more powerful than you think.
Source: SANS Security Awareness