Tag Archives: Application

RSAC 2019: An Antidote for Tech Gone Wrong

As many ponder the big ethical questions around cyber, some are proposing public interest technologist as a solution.
Source: Threatpost.com | Privacy

Microsoft Patch Alert: After a serene February, Microsoft plops KB 4023057 into the Update Catalog

Microsoft continues to hold Windows 10 version 1809 close to the chest. While all of the other Win10 versions have had their usual twice-a-month cumulative updates, the latest version of the last version of Windows, 1809, still sits in the Windows Insider Release Preview Ring.

For most people, that’s excellent news. It seems that Microsoft is willing to hold off until they get the bugs fixed, at least in the 1809 releases. May I hear a “hallelujah” from the chorus?

Mystery update bulldozer KB 4023057 hits the Catalog

You’ve heard me talk about KB 4023057 many times, most recently in January. It’s a mysterious patch that Microsoft calls an “update reliability improvement” whose sole reason for existence, as best I can tell, is to blast away any blocks your machine may have to keep the next version of Windows (in this case, Win10 1809) from installing on your machine.

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Source: Computerworld.com | Security

Now you can buy police-grade iPhone hacking tools on eBay

If you want to hack your way into an old iPhone, you can get hold of a law enforcement-grade system to do just that for a bargain price on eBay.

I think that’s a crime

I can’t stress this enough.

The very existence of tools like these is a threat to every smartphone user. That’s because no matter how many times people argue that these solutions will be used only by law enforcement, these things always proliferate.

The fact that Cellebrite systems, which law enforcement was until recently spending heavily on acquiring, are now available on the open market for as little as $100 is a perfect illustration of this.

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Source: Computerworld.com | Security

All about Android upgrades (and why they're late) | TECH(talk)

It’s not exactly news that Android upgrades almost always take a lo-o-o-o-o-ng time to roll out to most users. As in months. Often, many months. Sometimes more than a year.

Sometimes never.

(There is an exception: Google delivers new versions of Android to its Pixel line right away, and did just that with the release of Android 9.0 (Pie) last fall.)

It’s now been six months since Pie arrived, which means it’s time for Computerworld blogger JR Raphael’s comprehensive look at how device-makers are doing when it comes to upgrades. 

To read this article in full, please click here


Source: Computerworld.com | Security

With latest mobile security hole, could we at least focus on the right things?

A bunch of apps from some major players — including Expedia, Hollister, Air Canada, Abercrombie & Fitch, Hotels.com and Singapore Airlines — recently came to grief because of a security/privacy hole in a third-party analytics app they all used, according to a report from TechCrunch. The incident exposed extremely sensitive customer information including payment card and password data shared in clear text. That sort of thing shouldn’t be happening — and yet everyone seems focused on the wrong lesson.

The analytics app, called Glassbox, captures all information from a user’s interaction with the app, including keystrokes entered and spots on the touchscreen the user touched or clicked. It also may include some screen captures. In every case, the apps give insufficient privacy disclosures to app users, or none at all. And, as already mentioned, it shares sensitive data in clear text.

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Source: Computerworld.com | Security

Does Workplace have a Facebook problem?

Facebook emerged from 2018 bruised from a series of revelations that undermined trust in the popular social media platform and raised questions about its commitment to privacy.

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(Insider Story)
Source: Computerworld.com | Security

What is blockchain? The most disruptive tech in decades

Blockchain is poised to change IT in much the same way open-source software did a quarter of a century ago. And in the same way that Linux took more than a decade to become a cornerstone in modern application development, Blockchain will take years to become a lower cost, more efficient way to share information between open and private networks.

Because blockchain is based on a distributed, peer-to-peer topology where data can be stored globally on thousands of servers – and anyone on the network can see everyone else’s entries in real-time – it’s virtually impossible for one entity to gain control of or game the network.

But the hype around this seemingly new, secure electronic ledger is real. In essence, blockchain represents a new paradigm for the way information is shared and tech vendors and companies are rushing to figure out how they can use the distributed ledger technology to save time and admin costs. Numerous companies in 2017 began rolling out pilot programs and real-world projects across a variety of industries – everything from financial services to healthcare to mobile payments and even global shipping.

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Source: Computerworld.com | Security

What is Apple hiding with iOS 11.4?

Have you installed iOS 11.4? Once you’d looked at AirPlay 2and Messages in iCloud, did you happen to take a look at the contents of the security updates?

‘Details available soon’

If you did you’ll have been disappointed.

Apple hasn’t disclosed details concerning the security content of the new software. It hasn’t revealed anything concerning USB Restricted Mode, which apparently makes it harder for people to hack into your device.

To read this article in full, please click here


Source: Computerworld.com | Security

Yahoo Hacker Sentenced; Coke Opens Up a Can of Data Breach

Fortune 500 breaches seem to be a theme this week.
Source: Threatpost.com | Privacy